First Peter 4:11

1 Peter 4:11 Whoever * speaks, is to do so as one who is speaking the utterances of God; whoever * serves is to do so as one who is serving by the strength which God supplies; so that in all things God may be glorified through Jesus Christ, to whom belongs the glory and dominion forever and ever. Amen. (NASB: Lockman

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o theos; hina en pasin doxazetai o theos dia Iesou ChHYPERLINK “http://studylight.org/lex/grk/view.cgi?number=5547”ristouHYPERLINK “http://studylight.org/lex/grk/view.cgi?number=5547”, o estin (3SPAI) e doxa kai to kratos eis tous aionas ton aionon; amen.
Amplified: Whoever speaks, [let him do it as one who utters] oracles of God; whoever renders service, [let him do it] as with the strength which God furnishes aabundantly, so that in all things God may be glorified through Jesus Christ (the Messiah). To Him be the glory and dominion forever and ever (through endless ages). Amen (so be it).
NLT: Are you called to be a speaker? Then speak as though God Himself were speaking through you. Are you called to help others? Do it with all the strength and energy that God supplies. Then God will be given glory in everything through Jesus Christ. All glory and power belong to him forever and ever. Amen. . If anyone ministers, let him minister as out of the strength which God supplies, in order that in all things God may be glorified through Jesus Christ, in whom there is the glory and the power forever and ever. Amen.
Young’s Literal: if any one doth speak — ‘as oracles of God;’ if any one doth minister — ‘as of the ability which God doth supply;’ that in all things God may be glorified through Jesus Christ, to whom is the glory and the power — to the ages of the ages. Amen.

WHOEVER SPEAKS, LET HIM SPEAK, AS IT WERE, THE UTTERANCES OF GOD: ei tis lalei (3SPAI), os logia theou: (Isa 8:20; Jer 23:22; Ep 4:29; Col 4:6; Jas 1:19, 26; 3:1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) (oracles: Acts 7:38; Ro 3:2; Heb 5:12)

SPEAKING OR SERVING BOTH
DEPENDENT ON GOD’S ENABLEMENT

Whoever speaks – Literally “if anyone speaks” which is a first class condition and assumes that this is a fact, a fulfilled condition.

Speak (2980) (laleo) is the Greek verb meaning to make a sound and then to utter words.

Vincent says that laleo is “used of speaking, in contrast with or as a breaking of silence, voluntary or imposed. Thus the dumb man, after he was healed, spake (Mt 9:33 “And after the demon was cast out, the dumb man spoke; and the multitudes marveled, saying (lego), “Nothing like this was ever seen in Israel.”) and Zacharias, when his tongue was loosed, began to speak (Lk 1:64 “And at once his mouth was opened and his tongue loosed, and he began to speak in praise of God”) The use of the word laleo …contemplates the fact rather than the substance of speech. Hence it is used of God (He 1:1 – the point being, not what God said, but the fact that he spake to men. On the contrary, lego refers to the matter of speech. The verb originally means to pick out, and hence to use words selected as appropriate expressions of thought, and to put such words together in orderly discourse. (Vincent, M. R. Word Studies in the New Testament).

Peter is implying that there are two general categories of gifts: speaking gifts and serving gifts. Such distinctions are clear in the lists in Ro 12:6, 7, 8; 1Co 12:7, 8, 9, 10, 11,28, 29, 30. This division relates to the distinction God’s leaders made between ministry roles (Acts 6:2, 3,4). These two general ministry functions often overlap.


Utterances (
3051) (logion from lógios = an orator) in classical Greek was used of oracular utterances of heathen deities, but as used in Scripture refers to divine utterances or revelations.

MacArthurLogion (oracles) is a diminutive of logos ( which is most commonly translated word. Logion generally referred to important sayings or messages, especially supernatural utterances…In many pagan religions of that day, mediums and seers gave occultic predictions of the future and other messages from the spirit world through supernatural “oracles.” By observing the movements of fish in a tank, the formation of snakes in a pit, or listening to the calls of certain birds, fortune-tellers would purport to predict such things as business success or failure, military victory or defeat, and a happy or tragic marriage. Such a connotation could not have been further from Paul’s use of logion in this passage. (MacArthur, J: Romans 1-8. Chicago: Moody Press)

Logion is a striking synonym for the Holy Scriptures (in the NT the term “Scripture” or “Scriptures” usually was a reference to the OT) and is used only four times in the NT, stressing the fact that the Scriptures actually constituted the very utterances of God. These were given to and through the Jews and are preserved for us now in the Old Testament.

Acts 7:38 This (Moses) is the one who was in the congregation in the wilderness together with the angel who was speaking to him on Mount Sinai, and who was with our fathers; and he received living oracles (the Mosaic Law) to pass on to you
Romans 3:2 ) First of all, that they (the Jews) were entrusted with the oracles of God. (refers to the Old Testament).
Hebrews 5:12 For though by this time you ought to be teachers, you have need again for someone to teach you the elementary principles of the oracles of God, and you have come to need milk and not solid food. (in context considering that the epistle was addressed primarily to Jews, oracles of God most likely refers to the Old Testament),
1 Peter 4:11 the utterances of God (utterances of God through Christian teachers)

Peter’s point in this use of logion is that even if a man is gifted to preach or teach, he must be sure that the words he speaks (the logion) are, as if were, the very words God would have him say on that particular occasion. Obviously the closer one sticks to the pure milk of the Word, the better. The more one is in prayer and communion with God prior to speaking or teaching, the more likely will his message be as if it were the utterances of God.

Ray Pritchard (1 Peter 4:7-11 Day Before the End of the World) writes that…

Speaking includes anyone who teaches the Word of God whether publicly or privately, whether to a group or one-on-one. Whether from a pulpit or in a small group or to a Sunday School class. Peter says, if you speak, make sure you speak the very words of God. The primary temptation of any teacher is to render his opinion instead of God’s word. So we ought to ask a few questions:

§ What have you done with the gifts God has given you?
§ Who have you helped along the way?
§ Is your church better and stronger because you are here?
§ Are you wasting God’s gift or are you using it for his glory?

In Word War II, a little French town had a statue of Jesus in their town square. When the bombing came, the statue was damaged and pieces were broken off. They stored the pieces, and after the war, they began to rebuild the statue. It had cracks now, but they appreciated it even more. But to their dismay, the only pieces they couldn’t find were the hands of Jesus. That troubled them because the hands had the nail prints and that was significant to them. They thought they would have to take the statue down, until one person placed a gold plaque at the bottom of the statue that read, “He has no hands but ours.”

He has no hands but ours.
He has no eyes but ours.
He has no lips but ours.
He has no feet but ours.

Spurgeon puts it plainly – Reckon that every sermon is a wasted sermon which is not Christ’s Word. Believe that all theology is rotten rubbish which is not the Word of the Lord. Do not be satisfied with going to a place of worship and hearing an eloquent discourse, unless the sum and substance of it is the Word of the Lord. My brothers and sisters, whether you teach children or their parents, do not think you have done any good unless you have taught the Word of the Lord. For saving purposes we must have the Lord’s Word, and nothing else.

 

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