Several Ways Which We Should Approach The Birth Of Jesus Part 1

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Several Ways Which We Should Approach The Birth Of Jesus

Over the year there have been a lot said about the story of the birth of Jesus. We all have heard the narratives of the birth of Jesus and the surrounding story that goes with the story. Most of the time we read the story from Luke just before we open all those Christmas packages. Then there are all those plays in church, in schools, colleges. Sermons will be preached by preachers this seasons. Of course I have preached sermons for years. Well I have always had come questions about the way we present the story and usually we missed the purpose of the whole narrative. So can we just learn about what really happen historically about the time period of Jesus. ? In the last year I started the series of sermon from the book of Luke. And in this series I covered a whole lot of narrative on this subject.

LOOKING AT SIX ASPECTS OF THE BIRTH OF JESUS IN A NEW LIGHT

Charles e Whisnant, Pastor/Teacher/Student

December 20 2015 Rivers of Joy Baptist Church, Minford, Ohio

1. We Should Look at the Genealogy and Not Skip the genealogy in Matthew: Why?

2. Where was Jesus was born if there were no room in the inn. Was Jesus really born in a stable?

3. Looking at the Character of the Shepherds .

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1. We Should Look at the Genealogy and Not Skip the genealogy in Matthew 1.

FIRST: All it takes is a quick glance at Jesus’s family tree to understand why we hurry past it or why Handel didn’t memorialize it in his Messiah. The names sit there like lifeless skeletons.

The book of the genealogy of Jesus Christ, the Son of David, the Son of Abraham:

But when you read the genealogy thoughtfully, some names almost leap off the page: Rehoboam, Abijah, Joram, Ahaz, Manasseh, Jehoiachin and his brothers.

The truth is, Jesus came from a dysfunctional family line.

So when the angel tells Joseph to name the baby “Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins” (Matt. 1:21), this is undoubtedly a backward glance at Jesus’s family tree.

Even more intriguing is the inclusion of four women (five, counting his mother, Mary). It was rare for women to be listed in Jewish genealogies. These aren’t the women we might expect, either. Instead of Sarah or Rebekah, we get Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, and the wife of Uriah. Why?

For starters, all four have some past connection to sexual immorality.

Tamar seduced her father-in-law, and

Rahab was a prostitute.

Ruth was part of the Moabites, a people group with origins in incest (Gen. 19).

Bathsheba: The child born to Uriah’s wife was conceived as a result of an adulterous relationship with King David. Bathsheba 2 Samuel 12

But there’s more. All four women had Gentile connections. Tamar and Rahab were Canaanites; Ruth was a Moabite; Uriah’s wife was married to a Hittite. So include Matthew 1:1–17 the birth narrative in Matthew.

the stories of Tamar (and Judah), Rahab, Ruth, Bathsheba (and David), and Mary centered on how grace is for all people.

SECOND: Here we encounter a theme that runs throughout Matthew: the expansion of “his people”

21 “She will bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins.”) to include Gentiles who join with the godly Jewish remnant

Matthew 3:9 And do not presume to say to yourselves,‘We have Abraham as our father,’ for I tell you, God is able from these stones to raise up children for Abraham.

Matthew 8:11 I tell you, many will come from east and west and recline at table with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven,

Luke 13:29:And people will come from east and west, and from north and south, and recline at table in the kingdom of God

Ephesians 3:6; This mystery is that the Gentiles are fellow heirs, members of the same body, and partakers of the promise in Christ Jesus through the gospel.

Isaiah 59:19 So they shall fear the name of the Lord from the west, and his glory from the rising of the sun;

Malachi 1:11-12 For from the rising of the sun to its setting my name will be great among the nations, and in every place incense will be offered to my name, and a pure offering. For my name

2. Where was Jesus was born if there were no room in the inn. Was Jesus really born in a stable?

I shall not declare Jesus was born in a stable because there was no room in the inn. Was Jesus really born in a stable?

They spent the night in a separate building like a barn where the animals were kept.

TRUTH: There was no room on the upper floor of the house so they spent the night on the main floor of the house where the animals were kept inside the house. Most ancient Jewish houses had a common area on the main floor, including a manger where animals ate and slept at night, and an upper room where everyone slept. It is possible that there was a separate barn, but this would often be attached to the house directly. http://www.bible.ca/D-Xmas-story.htm

First, the problem Joseph and Mary encountered during their stay in Bethlehem wasn’t a lack of room in the inn. While most English versions still translate the Greek term katalyma as “inn” (Luke 2:7), the only other two occurrences of the word in the New Testament refer to a guest room where Jesus and his disciples shared a Passover meal (Mark 14:14; Luke 22:11).

Kenneth Bailey rightly asks, “If at the end of Luke’s Gospel the word katalyma means a guest room attached to a private home (22:11), why would it not have the same meaning near the beginning of his Gospel?”

The common idea of Jesus birth is that it was in a stable often on the out skirts of a home. The idea is that the birth of Jesus Christ was in a manger because there was no room available for them in the inn.

Could it be that the term used for inn is better rendered as “guest room” in the story of Jesus birth in comparison to an establishment for travelers?

And she brought forth her firstborn son, and wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger; because there was no room for them in the inn.
Luke 2:7 And wheresoever he shall go in, say ye to the goodman of the house, The Master saith, Where is the guestchamber, where I shall eat the passover with my disciples? Mark 14:14

And wheresoever he shall go in, say ye to the goodman of the house, The Master saith, Where is the guestchamber, where I shall eat the passover with my disciples? Luke 22:11 inn -G2646 – katalyma

Assuming Joseph was relying on the hospitality of a friend in Bethlehem whose guest room was already taken, what was the alternative? The placement of Jesus in a manger suggests he was born in a stable near the place of lodging, or even in a cave.

But there’s another alternative. Since the guest room was full, Joseph and Mary likely stayed in the family room with everyone else. It wasn’t uncommon for animals to stay in the house, since they provided heat in winter and were protected from theft.

Perhaps this seems like much ado about nothing, since any scenario—cave, stable, or family room with animals—reflects the humble circumstances in which Jesus was born. Yet getting the details right can keep us from turning the storyline into something untrue—a story of rejection or a harsh innkeeper or an incompetent husband who didn’t account for a crowded inn. It is the “normalness” of the birth that is so striking. The irony is the King of kings had an ordinary birth in humble circumstances.

To continue

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