Romans 8:28 What Does This Verse Imply Part One

Romans  8:28  #124

Charles e. Whisnant, July 29 2012

INTRODUCTION TO THIS WONDERFUL VERSE

PAUL IS WORKING OUT HIS GREAT ARGUMENTS THAT BELIEVERS ARE PROVIDED WITH FULL ASSURANCE AND THE ABSOLUTE CERTAINLY OF OUR ULTIMATE, FINAL, COMPLETE SALVATION AND DELIVERANCE FROM EVERYTHING THAT SIN HAS EVEER DONE TO US.

Paul has been throughout this chapter been giving the believer the assurances that their salvation is secure. And in each verse or verses Paul is laying down this assertion in a different manner but all in a way connected to the same them

Paul has been throughout this chapter been giving the believer the assurances that their salvation is secure. And in each verse or verses Paul is laying down this assertion in a different manner but all in a way connected to the same them

Other than John 3:16 this verse Romans 8:28 is quoted more often than any other verse.

Believers like to quote John 3:16 for security of the salvation of the whole world. (they say) and Romans 8:28 is quoted 1every time something is going bad for a person.

And there is nothing more necessary for a Believer than to be well persuaded of the happiness and privileges of their condition.  In so doing they will be able to serve God with cheerfulness and freedom of spirit and to pass through the troubles and difficulties of the world.

As Believers we experience a number of trials, there is going to be afflictions, there are going to be some storms of life.  There are going to be sorrows that we face.  So we do need some encouragement along the way in our Christian life.

HOW NOT TO READ IN TO THIS VERSE:  Let’s admit that we have some problems with Romans 8:28.

1. It’s been misused. Like many other Christian clichés, this verse has been thrown in the face of those who are suffering.

2. It’s been misquoted. This verse is often taken out of context and key words are left out. I’ve heard it put like this: “Everything will work out in the end” or “This tragedy is a good thing.” These words are not only hollow; they are hurtful to someone who is already hurting.

3. It’s been misunderstood. My goal today is to help each of us fully understand what God is saying to us so that we can stop staring and start singing again. This morning my outline is very simple.

I want us to look at God’s promise, His purpose, and finally the process He takes us through.

Here’s the entire sermon in one sentence: “God’s good for us is not our comfortability, but our conformity to Christ.”  So now we can go home.

WE NEED TO TAKE /CARE AS WE READ THIS VERSE AND NOT READ INTO THIS VERSE WHAT IS NOT THERE?

1A       Paul does not say that  everyone will be blessed, or all things for all people will work out.

2A       When a person says “I am so very blessed.”  They usually are looking at this perspective from the materialistic side.  They are referring that God is blessing them when in fact that is a false position to take.

3A       Paul is talking only about Believers in Jesus Christ, our Lord and Saviour, King of Kings an Lord of Lords.

4A       Paul is not saying “all things work together for good; isn’t it marvelous how everything seems to be conspiring together for our well being!” That is not what Paul is saying.

5A       There is a major difference between the false optimism of the world, the generalities in which worldly people delight, and the particular statements of the Scripture.

All is not right with the world, all is wrong with the world. That is why the Believer’s salvation ever becomes necessary.

The optimism that so many have is false optimism,  You know if a person is falsely allured into a false kind of optimism about life, which is going to dam there soul that is not good.  If a person goes to bed with a false kind of optimism that does not stand up to the test of truth and the facts of life that is not good.

SO WE MUST EXAMINE CLOSEY THIS STATEMENT SINCE THE PAUL IS SO OFTEN MISQUOTED.

 “God’s good for us is not our comfortability, but our conformity to Christ.” God weaves His ways for His glory and for our good. The truth of Romans 8:28 is illustrated in the lives of many biblical characters.

  • Joseph. Joseph was sold into slavery by his brothers, falsely accused, mistreated by Potiphar, and suffered greatly. And yet he could say to his brothers in Genesis 50:20: “You meant it for evil, but God meant it for good.”
  • Jonah. Jonah is a negative illustration. He came to expect “good” from God which in his definition was pleasure and comfort and the destruction of his enemies. God was good to Jonah by using pagan sailors, a big fish, a plant, and even a worm to accomplish his ultimate purpose of saving the Ninevites – and teaching Jonah a lesson.
  • Job. Job was a righteous man who experienced incredible suffering. The teaching of this book is that every event in our lives cannot be viewed as the result of some act on our part. Job’s friends tried to link suffering with sin and prosperity with piety. Job learned that there is a plan and a purpose but the particulars may be unexplainable in this life.

Jesus. Perhaps the greatest illustration of Romans 8:28 is found in the life of Jesus himself. Many awful things were done to Him – he was denied, betrayed, falsely accused, wrongly tried, found guilty, beaten, spit upon, mocked, and finally crucified. But God brought incredible good out of this atrocious act as Acts 2:23 states: “This man was handed over to you by God’s set purpose and

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